ESWT-Soundwave Therapy

While surgery is the standard treatment for many foot and ankle pain disorders, surgery can result in undesirable side effects such as scarring, delayed healing, nerve entrapment, and infection as well as several weeks or months of downtime while the patient heals.

Until recently, surgery was the only option to treat certain cases of foot, Achilles, tendon and heel pain.

With the introduction of Focused and Radial ESWT-Soundwave therapy, patients now have a viable alternative to surgery when treating these disorders.


ESWT-Soundwave Therapy is the most advanced and highly effective non-invasive treatment method for foot and ankle pain cleared by the FDA.

This proprietary technology is based on a unique set of pressure waves that stimulate the metabolism, enhance blood circulation and accelerate the healing process. Damaged tissue gradually regenerates and eventually heals. 

This non-invasive procedure represents a breakthrough treatment option for a broad range of musculoskeletal conditions.


ESWT-Soundwave therapy can treat acute or chronic musculoskeletal pain and/or pain that significantly impairs mobility or quality of life.


This non-invasive treatment has virtually no risks or side effects. The beneficial effects of ESWT-Soundwave Therapy are often experienced after only 3 treatments. Many patients report immediate pain relief after the first treatment, although it can take up to 4 weeks for pain relief to begin. The procedure eliminates pain and restores full mobility, thus improving your quality of life for various disorders including:


  • Foot and heel pain
  • Achilles pain
  • Tendon and/or tendon insertion pain
  • Neuromas
  • Trigger points


ESWT-Soundwave therapy has a proven success rate that is equal to or greater than that of traditional treatment methods (including surgery)

Over 80% of patients treated report to be pain free and/or have significant pain reduction.


This non-invasive treatment has virtually no risks or side effects. The beneficial effects of ESWT-Soundwave Therapy are often experienced after only 3 treatments. Many patients report immediate pain relief after the first treatment, although it can take up to 4 weeks for pain relief to begin. The procedure eliminates pain and restores full mobility, thus improving your quality of life for various disorders including:


  • Foot and heel pain
  • Achilles pain
  • Tendon and/or tendon insertion pain
  • Neuromas
  • Trigger points

ESWT-Soundwave therapy has a proven success rate that is equal to or greater than that of traditional treatment methods (including surgery)


ESWT-Soundwave Therapy has all of the benefits of traditional procedures without the risks, complications and lengthy recovery time. ESWT-Soundwave Therapy is performed in your physician’s office/clinic, does not require anesthesia, requires a minimal amount of time, patients can immediately bear weight (i.e. walk), and return to normal activity within a few days of the procedure.


  • Non-invasive
  • No anesthesia
  • No risk of infection
  • No scarring
  • No downtime

Compare the benefits of ESWT-Soundwave Therapy vs. Surgery with the Table Below

Results

ESWT-Soundwave Therapy

Surgery

Invasiveness

Non-Invasive Technique.

Invasive procedure requires opening of the skin

Anesthesia

No Anesthesia Needed. 

Sedation to General Anesthesia is needed and ranges from numbing affected area to rendering patient unconscious for the duration of the procedure.  

Risk of Infection

No Risk of Infection

Low to high depending on procedure. With surgery there is always a risk of infection leading to other issues

Scarring

No Scarring

Depending on procedure but there is always signs of  surgical scarring

Recovery Time

ZERO: Patient can resume normal activities immediately after treatment

Recovery time ranges from 2 to 6 weeks depending on procedure.

Patient Satisfaction

Over 80%

Varies depending on procedure. For certain procedure can be as low as 10%.

PubMed listed publications 

Extracorporeal shockwave therapy in patients with Morton’s Neuroma Hyun Seok , MD, PhD, Sang-Hyun Kim , MD, PhD, Seung Yeol Lee , MD, Sung Won Park , MD Journal of the American Podiatric Medical Association (2016)


Clinically relevant effectiveness of focused extracorporeal shock wave therapy in the treatment of chronic plantar fasciitis: a randomized, controlled multicenter study Gollwitzer, H; Saxena, A; DiDomenico, LA; Galli, L; Bouché, RT; Caminear, DS; Fullem, B; Vester, JC; Horn, C; Banke, IJ; Burgkart, R; Gerdesmeyer, L. The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery (2015)


Two emerging technologies for achilles tendinopathy and plantar fasciopathyLanger PRClinics in Podiatric Medicine and Surgery (2015)


Ultrasonographic evaluation of low energy extracorporeal pulse activated therapy (EPAT) for chronic plantar fasciitisGordon RWong CCrawford EJ.  Foot & Ankle International (2012)


Comparison between extracorporeal shockwave therapy, placebo ESWT and endoscopic plantar fasciotomy for the treatment of chronic plantar heel pain in the athleteSaxena AFournier MGerdesmeyer LGollwitzer HMuscles, Ligaments and Tendons Journal (2012)


Successful treatment of chronic plantar fasciitis with two sessions of radial extracorporeal shock wave therapy. Ibrahim Ibrahim M, Donatelli R, Schmitz C, Hellman M, Buxbaum F. Foot & Ankle International (2010)


Comparison of radial versus focused extracorporeal shock waves in plantar fasciitis using functional measures. Lohrer H, Nauck T, Dorn-Lange NV, Schöll J, Vester JC. Foot Ankle International (2010)


Radial extracorporeal shock wave therapy is safe and effective in the treatment of chronic recalcitrant plantar fasciitis: results of a confirmatory randomized placebo-controlled multicenter study. Gerdesmeyer LFrey CVester JMaier MWeil L JrWeil L SrRusslies MStienstra JScurran BFedder KDiehl PLohrer HHenne MGollwitzer H.  American Journal of Sports Medicine (2008)


Extracorporeal shock wave therapy for chronic painful heel syndrome: a prospective, double blind, randomized trial assessing the efficacy of a new electromagnetic shock wave deviceGollwitzer HDiehl Pvon Korff ARahlfs VWGerdesmeyer LJournal of Foot Ankle Surgery (2007)


Extracorporeal Shock Wave Therapy for the Treatment of Plantar Fasciitis Theodore GHBuch MAmendola ABachmann CFleming LLZingas C. Foot & Ankle International (2004)


Effect of shock-wave therapy on patellar tendinopathy in a rabbit model. Hsu RW, Hsu WH, Tai CL, Lee KF. Journal of Orthopedic Research (2004)


Ultrasonographic evaluation at 6-month follow-up of plantar fasciitis after extracorporeal shock wave therapy. Hammer DSAdam FKreutz ARupp SKohn DSeil RArchives of Orthopaedic and Trauma Surgery (2003)

Shock wave therapy induces neovascularization at the tendon-bone junction: a study in rabbits. Wang CJ, Wang FS, Yang KD, Weng LH, Hsu CC, Huang CS, Yang LC. Journal of Orthopedic Research (2003)


Preliminary Results on the Safety and Efficacy of ESWT for Treatment of Plantar Fasciitis.  Alvarez R.  Foot & Ankle International (2002)

Achilles

Extracorporeal shock wave therapy improves the walking ability of patients with peripheral artery disease and intermittent claudication. Serizawa F, Ito K, Kawamura K, Tsuchida K, Hamada Y, Zukeran T, Shimizu T, Akamatsu D, Hashimoto M, Goto H, Watanabe T, Sato A, Shimokawa H, Satomi S. Japanese Circulation Journal (2012)


Extra-corporeal pulsed-activated therapy (“EPAT” sound wave) for Achilles tendinopathy: a prospective study Saxena ARamdath S JrO’Halloran PGerdesmeyer LGollwitzer H. The Journal of Foot & Ankle Surgery (2011)


Eccentric loading versus eccentric loading plus shock-wave treatment for midportion Achilles tendinopathy: a randomized controlled trial.  Rompe JD, Furia J, Maffulli N. American Journal of Sports Medicine (2009)


Eccentric loading compared with shock wave treatment for chronic insertional achilles tendinopathy: a randomized, controlled trial.  Rompe JD, Furia J, Maffulli N. The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery (2008)


Eccentric loading, shock-wave treatment, or a wait-and-see policy for tendinopathy of the main body of tendon Achillis: a randomized controlled trial. Rompe JD, Nafe B, Furia JP, Maffulli N. American Journal of Sports Medicine (2007)


High-energy extracorporeal shock wave therapy as a treatment for insertional Achilles tendinopathyFuria JPThe American Journal of Sports Medicine (2006)


Shock wave therapy for chronic Achilles tendon pain: a randomized placebo-controlled trial. Costa ML, Shepstone L, Donell ST, Thomas TL. Clinical Orthopedics and Related Research (2005)

Lower Extremity

The effectiveness of extracorporeal shock wave therapy in lower limb tendinopathy: a systematic reviewMani-Babu SMorrissey DWaugh CScreen HBarton CAmerican Journal of Sports Medicine (2014)


Vibration and pressure wave therapy for calf strains: a proposed treatment. Saxena ASt Louis MFournier MMuscles, Ligaments and Tendons Journal (2013)


Ultrasonographic evaluation of low energy extracorporeal pulse activated therapy (EPAT) for chronic plantar fasciitis.  Gordon R, Wong C, Crawford EJ.  (Foot Ankle Int. Mar 2012)


High-energy focused extracorporeal shockwave therapy reduces pain in plantar fibromatosis (Ledderhose’s disease). Knobloch K, Vogt PM. BioMed Central Research Notes (2012)


Shockwave treatment for medial tibial stress syndrome in athletes; a prospective controlled study Moen MHRayer SSchipper MSchmikli SWeir ATol JLBackx FJ. British Journal of Sports Medicine (2011)


Shockwave therapy for the treatment of chronic proximal hamstring tendinopathy in professional athletesCacchio ARompe JDFuria JPSusi PSantilli VDe Paulis FThe American Journal of Sports Medicine (2010)


Low-energy extracorporeal shock wave therapy as a treatment for medial tibial stress syndrome Rompe JDCacchio AFuria JPMaffulli NAmerican Journal of Sports Medicine (2009)


Extracorporeal shockwave for chronic patellar tendinopathyWang CJKo JYChan YSWeng LHHsu SLThe American Journal of Sports Medicine (2007)


Extracorporeal shock wave therapy in the treatment of chronic tendinopathies. Sems A, Dimeff R, Iannotti JP. Journal of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (2006)


Effects of shock waves on the microcirculation in critical limb ischemia (CLI) (8-week study).  De Sanctis MT1, Belcaro GNicolaides ANCesarone MRIncandela LMarlinghaus EGriffin MCapodanno SCiccarelli RAngiology (2000)


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